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Classification of March Rifle Scopes

Posted 10/08/2019

The other day I (Mari) received an email from one of our customers that it was hard to find the desired scope on our website.

I must admit that our model names can be quite confusing…

So today I made a chart below in order to search the scope quicker (except for Genesis).

Hope this helps for better understanding ! You can click the letters in blue. 

 

Focal Plane \ Body Tube 30mm

34mm ( – X)

First Focal Plane ( – F)

 

 

 

 

March – F

1-8x24mm Shorty

1-8x24mm

3-24x42mm

3-24x52mm

 

March – FX

5-40x56mm

 

 

 

 

Second Focal Plane

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 

5-32x52mm

10-60x52mm

 

March Compact

1-4x24mm

1-4.5x24mm

1-10x24mm

2.5-25x42mm

2.5-25x52mm

 

March Fixed Power

48x52mm (High Master)

40-60x52mm (High Master)

 

 

 

March – X

10-60x56mm (High Master)

5-50x56mm

8-80x56mm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Focal Plane

 

For FFP-First Focal Plane reticle, when you change the magnification, the target and the reticle will zoom in and out collectively.

The reticle line will be fine at lower magnification and thicker at higher magnification.

The scale value will always be consistent regardless of the magnification.

Therefore this reticle is suited for hunting.

Since the first focal plane reticle is assembled in front of the zooming feature,

the point of aim (POA) does not change throughout the entire zoom range.

 

 



Second Focal Plane

 

The thickness of the SFP-Second Focal Plane reticle is always constant and only the target image will be larger at higher magnification.

Therefore this reticle is suited for long range precision shooting.

Scale value of the reticle is designed at the specific magnification.

This means that you will need to convert the scale value at other magnification.
The advantage of the Second focal plane reticle is that you will have a constant reticle thickness throughout the entire magnification

and that you will have a thick and easy to see reticle even at the lowest magnification.

 

 

 



Written by : Mari Morita

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